Funding Sources

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ScholarCentric

Success Highways has helped me change my attitude on how I think about school.”

- Roosevelt High School Student, San Antonio, TX
Funding sources for the Success Highways Resiliency Solution

Districts and schools use a variety of funding sources to implement the Success Highways Resiliency Solution.  Below is a list of the most common funding sources used to implement Success Highways. To learn how Success Highways aligns with the goals and requirements of each funding source, click on the “View Alignment” button below each grant description. If we can assist you with securing funding or if you have questions about alignment with other grants and programs, please contact us.

Elementary & Secondary School Counseling Program
The Elementary and Secondary School Counseling program supports programs in target elementary, K-12, or secondary schools to establish or expand counseling programs. These efforts include hiring staff members in counseling, social work, psychologist, or psychiatrist roles as well as implementing services that use a developmental, prevention approach to support students.

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Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP)
GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) focus on increasing the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in post secondary education. GEAR UP provides six-year grants to states and partnerships to provide services in high-poverty middle and high schools. Grantees serve an entire cohort of students beginning no later than seventh grade and follow the cohort through high school.

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Investing in Innovation (i3)
Through Investing in Innovation (i3), Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) and nonprofit organizations with a record of improving student achievement will expand the implementation of, and investment in, innovative practices that are demonstrated to have an impact on:

  • Improving student achievement or student growth
  • Closing achievement gaps
  • Decreasing dropout rates
  • Increasing high school graduation rates
  • Improving college enrollment and completion rates

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Promise Neighborhoods
Promise Neighborhoods grants provide funding to significantly improve the educational and developmental outcomes of all children in the most distressed communities by: supporting efforts to improve child outcomes, identifying and increasing the capacity to build a college-going culture, building a continuum of academic programs and family and community supports from cradle through college to career, integrating these efforts across local agencies, and evaluating the overall impact.

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Race to the Top
Through Race to the Top, States will advance school reform around four specific areas:

  • Adopting standards and assessments that prepare students to succeed in college and the workplace and to compete in the global economy.
  • Building data systems that measure student growth and success, and inform teachers and principals about how they can improve instruction.
  • Recruiting, developing, rewarding, and retaining effective teachers and principals, especially where they are needed most.
  • Turning around the lowest-achieving schools.

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Safe and Supportive Schools
Safe and Supportive Schools awards grants to State Educational Agencies (SEAs) to support statewide measurement of, and targeted interventions and solutions to promote safe learning environments for youth. Without a safe learning environment, the health, well-being, and future potential of young people is at risk.

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School Improvement Funds
In conjunction with Title I funds for school improvement, SIG funds are used to improve student achievement in Title I schools identified for improvement, corrective action, or restructuring so as to enable those schools to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) and exit improvement status. A Local Educational Agency’s (LEA’s) total SIG grant may not be less than $50,000 or more than $200,000 per year for each school it commits to serve.

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Title I—Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged
The purpose of Title I, Part A Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged is to ensure that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education and reach proficiency on challenging state academic achievement standards and assessments. Title I focuses on high-poverty, low achieving students. Title I requires that local school districts ensure that all Title I teachers in core academic subjects are “highly qualified” as defined by each state.

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Title I, D—Prevention & Intervention for Children and Youth Who are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk
Title I, Part D Prevention & Intervention Programs for Children & Youth Who are Neglected, Delinquent, or At-Risk provides financial assistance to educational programs for youths in state-operated institutions or community day programs. The program also provides funding to support school districts’ programs involving collaboration with locally operated correctional facilities.

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Title IV, B—21st Century Community Learning Centers
The 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program provides services, during nonschool hours or periods, to students and their families for academic enrichment, including tutorial and other services to help students, particularly those who attend low-performing schools, to meet state and local student academic achievement standards. While the focus is on improving students’ academic achievement, other activities associated with youth development, recreation, the arts, and drug prevention, as well as literacy services for parents, are permitted. 21st CCLCs:

  • Focus services on promoting students’ academic achievement after school
  • Require programs to meet principles of effectiveness
  • Require a comprehensive evaluation of the program and activities
  • Target services for students in schools eligible for Title I school wide projects or schools that serve a high percentage of students from low-income families

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Title V, B—Innovative Programs
The Innovative Programs formula grants allow recipients to use funds to benefit any and all student populations, in any and all schools. The purposes of the program are to:

  • Support local education reform efforts that are consistent with statewide education reform efforts.
  • Provide funding to enable States and LEAs to implement promising educational reform programs and school improvement initiatives based on scientifically based research.
  • Provide a continuing source of innovation and educational improvement, including support for library services and instructional and media materials, and meet the educational needs of all students, including at risk students.
  • Develop education programs to improve school, student, and teacher performance.

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Title X, C—McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Programs
The purpose of Title X, Part C is intended to ensure that homelessness does not cause these children to be left behind in school. Homeless children and youths should have access to education and other services that they need to meet the same challenging state student achievement standards to which all students are held.

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TRIO (Upward Bound & Talent Search)
TRIO programs provide services to students from underserved backgrounds and aim to assist low-income individuals, first-generation college students, and students with disabilities as they progress from middle school through college.

  • In particular, the Upward Bound and Talent Search programs which are part of the TRIO offerings are well suited for middle and high school students.
  • Upward Bound provides support to students as they prepare for college entrance; it helps high schoolers succeed in their pre-college work and higher education pursuits.
  • Talent Search supports students with academic, career, and financial counseling and encourages them to graduate from high school and complete postsecondary education.

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